Jump to content

Tooth extraction in 9 year old - FINAL UPDATE...


  • Please log in to reply
29 replies to this topic

#1 ~Nic~

Posted 08 August 2019 - 03:08 AM

Found out a few weeks ago that 9 yo DS has the same enamel deficiency that his older brother has but unfortunately wasn't caught as soon as his brother and one of his molars is already damaged beyond repair. Dentist suggested extraction of that tooth as well as the 3 other equivalent teeth which all have the enamel deficiency, but so far have do not show any signs of decay. I was very hesitant about removing 3 healthy teeth so we went to an orthodontist to get an opinion on bite and alignment if only the one tooth is removed and he has confirmed that his bite won't be affected and just to remove the one. He also suggested it would be best just to have it done in the chair with gas due to potential risks associated with GA. Going to get the tooth extracted on Friday and I am so nervous for him. I've never had an extraction so I have no idea what to expect. If he just has the gas and a local, how horrible will it be?? Will it be really painful afterwards? I'm just so upset that he has to go through this, even though he has always looked after his teeth.

Edited by ~Nic~, 10 August 2019 - 12:08 AM.


#2 TinyGiraffe

Posted 08 August 2019 - 04:28 AM

Due to overcrowding I had 4 otherwise perfectly healthy teeth removed around the same age. It was done in the chair with just local anaesthetic and was fine and didn't hurt. For me they did 1 side at a time (1 top/1 bottom) and remember drinking and speaking was awkward for a few hrs while the anaesthetic wore off and I probably had softer foods for a day or two.

#3 born.a.girl

Posted 08 August 2019 - 05:53 AM

As one of six from the fifties, tooth extraction was as common as mud, unfortunately.

I've actually had far worse dental procedures - the recent root canal over 4 x 45 min appointments was fifty times worse than an extraction.

The worst bit will be the numbing injection, and afterwards the area's a bit tender, and soft food's the go for quite a few days.


Good luck to him with it, not pleasant for sure, but having been through it heaps of times, and also having to have one removed under GA, I'd go with the chair anyday, over so quickly.

#4 barrington

Posted 08 August 2019 - 06:13 AM

My children have had several teeth extracted.  The dental nurses apply numbing gel so they can't feel the needle.  It is a super quick procedure if the child is calm - we don't even give soft food afterwards.  If you are concerned about pain, then check if you can give some panadol or nurofen prior to the procedure.

#5 Sincerely

Posted 08 August 2019 - 07:37 AM

View Post~Nic~, on 08 August 2019 - 03:08 AM, said:

Found out a few weeks ago that 9 yo DS has the same enamel deficiency that his older brother has but unfortunately wasn't caught as soon as his brother and one of his molars is already damaged beyond repair. Dentist suggested extraction of that tooth as well as the 3 other equivalent teeth which all have the enamel deficiency, but so far have do not show any signs of decay. I was very hesitant about removing 3 healthy teeth so we went to an orthodontist to get an opinion on bite and alignment if only the one tooth is removed and he has confirmed that his bite won't be affected and just to remove the one. He also suggested it would be best just to have it done in the chair with gas due to potential risks associated with GA. Going to get the tooth extracted on Friday and I am so nervous for him. I've never had an extraction so I have no idea what to expect. If he just has the gas and a local, how horrible will it be?? Will it be really painful afterwards? I'm just so upset that he has to go through this, even though he has always looked after his teeth.

I'm very wary of some paediatric dentists. When DS was 4, one of them wanted to extract two of his baby teeth and put crowns on three others (he was a difficult child who wouldn't obey my instructions to brush his teeth & I was too busy as a working parent to put my foot down). She insisted that the two she wanted to extract were beyond repair. I went to a childrens' dental group who were not trained as paediatric dentists and he ended up with just three fillings, no extractions or crowns, which have lasted up to his teens (he started taking care of his teeth after that first appointment).

Wanting to extract three healthy teeth sounds a bit suspicious so I don't know if it's worth seeking another opinion on the damaged molar if it's not painful or infected and therefore the planned procedure isn't urgent.

I'm very sorry if this suggestion makes things worse, but I thought really hard about whether to post and I was glad somebody told me to seek another opinion for my DS.

#6 theboys2

Posted 08 August 2019 - 08:20 AM

My son has had two extractions - he is 7.5years old.

First one was an supernumero tooth (an extra tooth) and he had that out last November - so before his 7th birthday.

He was amazing. I told him what would be happening before hand. I explained he would have to get a needle to numb the area but that they dentist would be a gel on his gums before hand to help with the needle pinching hurt feeling.

He had a little bit of squirming when the needle was being put in the palate as the dentist explained that is really hard to numb with the gel so it is the worse area to do. After the numbing injection went in he wriggled the tooth a little and it was done. Son was eating me out of house and home within the next hour so he was not phased by it at all!

did cost me a bit of bribery lol but he was a champ and was still lots cheaper and less traumatic giong into hospital.

Second time he had to have a tooth come out due to an infection which has had recurrent abcess and swelling in his gums. Dentist still not sure why it happened as he has very good teeth also.

This one was the second back molar. took a little more numbing injection to numb the area as when the dentist tried to start wriggling and pushing the tooth my son told him to stop so he gave him some more numbing stuff (whcih by then the needle wasnt painful at all so he was fine),. again handled like a champ and after maybe 20 mins he was fine and asking for maccas and ice cream for dinner lol.

I think just explain what is giong to happen as simply but as matter of factly as you can. I think it was better for my son as he knew what was going to be happening and wasnt completely freaked when he came at him with a huge silver shinny needle lol

#7 Sarzie

Posted 08 August 2019 - 08:23 AM

My six year old had an extra tooth extracted this year. She’s a pretty anxious but it was ok. They had an IPad up which she watched during the entire procedure and she got to choose bubble gum flavoured gas. I bribed her with a toy she really wanted and she was fine. Afterwards we gave her soft foods for a few days but she said it wasn’t too painful after. She had Panadol.

#8 HippyDippyBaloney

Posted 08 August 2019 - 08:48 AM

My 10 year old recently had 3 healthy teeth extracted in the chair.

The first one was an incisor and only took a couple of minutes. He didn’t have gas. He was pretty brave through the process, but definitely found the needles to numb the area the worst. The numbing process took much longer than the actual extraction.

We did the next two teeth (both molars) in another appt the following week. The first of these was already wobbly and was really quite simple. I think this gave my son a false sense of security about the next one. The next one was really quite traumatic. It wasn’t wobbly at all and when it eventually did come out it still had really long roots, a sign that it really wasn’t ready. It took about 45 minutes just for this one. We almost gave up but my son also didn’t want to be put to sleep so he just kept soldiering on, despite the fact he was in tears the whole time. He definitely earned my bribes that day.

Good luck for your son, I hope it’s a smooth process.

#9 seayork2002

Posted 08 August 2019 - 09:03 AM

Speaking from experience, take a change of clothes for the child.

#10 lazycritter

Posted 08 August 2019 - 11:21 AM

I had several extractions atfrom the age of 8 to 14 because my mouth was too small for a full set of teeth.

My youngest had a tooth extracted last year at age 8 he  did really well. He told me the other day it was his favourite dentist.! 😲😲😲😲😲

The best thing for me, and I tried to be the same for my son,  was my mum's attitude of 'just do it'.

I did offer a reward for getting through it.  I can't remember what it  was. But you could offer a extra large tooth fairy payment.

However I'd avoid making a big deal especially if your child isn't nervous himself. A good dentist will say all the right things and the experience should be smooth sailing.

#11 mayahlb

Posted 08 August 2019 - 11:36 AM

My now 10.5 yr old has had to have 2 teeth extracted. Both times it has been in the chair. One was the first molar after the incisor due to an abscess (the other was a front tooth that refused to fall out and was causing damage to the adult tooth coming in). They numbed it with gel before using the local and it was fine. I would only be removing the damaged tooth. Our dentist recommended using tooth mousse on his teeth that have enamel issues.

#12 TequilaMockingbird

Posted 08 August 2019 - 12:32 PM

My then 9yo has had to have four teeth extracted for orthodontic work.

It was done in the chair, with local anesthetic- no gas.

Honestly, the worst part for her was that she had to keep gauze in her mouth for twenty minutes afterwards- she went and hid away in my bed and sobbed as she thought she looked silly.

In the lead up, I bought a new Beanie Boo for her to hold onto in the chair if she wanted, and completely talked up all of the yummy soft foods she would get to eat, including buying a hideously expensive tub of ice cream that was hers and hers alone.

And the tooth fairy brought extra money.

#13 JomoMum

Posted 08 August 2019 - 01:25 PM

I had a number of my first teeth removed in my early primary years. The roots on my baby teeth never shrunk and my adult teeth grew out over the top/bottom of them before the baby ones had fallen out.

So I realise I’m talking about different teeth, in that your son’s teeth are adult.

But to be honest, I have horrific memories of them being removed. When a tooth isn’t loose, it takes a lot of effort to remove it from the jaw bone. I remember a lot of hard pulling.  

That said, it can completely depend on the actual tooth, the dentist, techniques etc. I would really just suggest that he be able to have a lot of gas and painkillers.

It never deterred me from going to the dentist growing up and I’ve always had a good relationship with them. And I have healthy teeth now as an adult.

ETA OP try not to let it upset you too much. Sometimes these things are unavoidable. And you know that you’ve always looked after his teeth as best you can.

Edited by JomoMum, 08 August 2019 - 01:27 PM.


#14 WTFancie shmancie

Posted 08 August 2019 - 02:23 PM

I had to have a number of first teeth removed as a child as my second teeth were coming through and the first ones were still hanging in there.

I've also had two wisdom teeth removed in the chair just using local anaesthesia.  

There is a lot of force and pressure exerted, but no pain.

#15 Veritas Vinum Arte

Posted 08 August 2019 - 04:06 PM

I had 4 adult molars removed at 12 yrs in the chair. Was the worst experience of my life andgave me a huge phobia of dentists for the next 30 years. Even today any dental work is actually done without a needle as I hate the numb feeling and find the needles more painful than the actual dental work.

I had my wisdom teeth out under GA. DD needed 4 teeth removed this year (9yrs) and she also did GA.

Goodluck

#16 born.a.girl

Posted 08 August 2019 - 04:15 PM

View PostVeritas Vinum Arte, on 08 August 2019 - 04:06 PM, said:

I had 4 adult molars removed at 12 yrs in the chair. Was the worst experience of my life andgave me a huge phobia of dentists for the next 30 years. Even today any dental work is actually done without a needle as I hate the numb feeling and find the needles more painful than the actual dental work.

I had my wisdom teeth out under GA. DD needed 4 teeth removed this year (9yrs) and she also did GA.

Goodluck


I think wisdom teeth are almost always GA anyway, aren't they?  I know my 27 year old's need to come out and she asked the dentist if he could do it in the chair, but he said it was too difficult as generally impacted ones require actual surgery.

The injections are awful, but they're over pretty quickly.

Personally much as I hate the dentist (which I assumed was universal) I'd prefer it was over quickly than the palaver of a GA.

#17 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 08 August 2019 - 04:30 PM

I've had plenty of teeth removed as a result of a small jaw. Always in the chair and with gas/local. Never been a problem for me, always went smoothly, but I know it can knock others around. I had root canal work done when I was 13, that was a bit more of a tense situation, I learnt to "zen" myself out when in the dentist chair.

As an adult, I had all four wisdom teeth removed under local (2 taken one day, the other two done a fortnight later). I didn't get anywhere near the same kind of bruising or sick effects as some of my friends. My dentist said that many dentists take a bit more care with extractions when the patient is conscious and staring them down, LOL (I don't know how true that is). My wisdom teeth were not terribly difficult extractions though, when you looked at the xrays (straight roots, it was just that my jaw didn't have the room for them).

DD1 had two teeth extracted last year  (when she was 10) as her adult teeth were coming through but the baby teeth weren't budging, which was pushing the adult teeth in the wrong direction. She had it done under local, was over in less than 10 minutes, she was back at school within a hour or so.

ETA: I found teeth extractions to be mostly uncomfortable. Once the area is numbed by anesthetic, there is no pain. I could register that the dentist was pulling, wiggling or twisting, I could sense that was happening, but it didn't actually hurt to come out.

Edited by YodaTheWrinkledOne, 08 August 2019 - 04:39 PM.


#18 Veritas Vinum Arte

Posted 08 August 2019 - 04:38 PM

View Postborn.a.girl, on 08 August 2019 - 04:15 PM, said:

Personally much as I hate the dentist (which I assumed was universal) I'd prefer it was over quickly than the palaver of a GA.

I LOVE GAs... the best sleep ever. I recover very quickly.

#19 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 08 August 2019 - 04:41 PM

View Postborn.a.girl, on 08 August 2019 - 05:53 AM, said:

having been through it heaps of times, and also having to have one removed under GA, I'd go with the chair anyday, over so quickly.
same here.  Seems like GA is such a big ordeal, and more expensive to boot!

#20 born.a.girl

Posted 08 August 2019 - 04:59 PM

View PostVeritas Vinum Arte, on 08 August 2019 - 04:38 PM, said:

I LOVE GAs... the best sleep ever. I recover very quickly.


I do love the 'disappearing' bit, but I've had way too many GAs in my life - majority were only lighter ones, but the recovery from a long one showed me just what they do to your body.  I daydream about that bit when I can't get to sleep!

That, combined with having had concussion twice, makes me wary.

I also loathe all of the booking in palaver because I have a complicated medical history, despite being pretty good for my age. There's an awful lot of sitting around, too.

#21 born.a.girl

Posted 08 August 2019 - 05:00 PM

View PostYodaTheWrinkledOne, on 08 August 2019 - 04:41 PM, said:

same here.  Seems like GA is such a big ordeal, and more expensive to boot!

Yeah, day surgery $500 oop for me with my PHI. Plus the anaesthetist on top of whatever the surgeon charges.

Anyways, hoping to not have any more removed, although I was very, very VERY tempted with this latest damned root canal which took four treatments - one involved four injections given the way he had to approach it and how deep it was.

#22 ~Nic~

Posted 08 August 2019 - 10:40 PM

Thanks for the advice everyone... The dentist told us at a previous appointment about the enamel deficiency but it deteriorated fast. He came off his bike on mother's Day and chipped his front three (adult) teeth. Took him to the dentist the next day and that's when we found out that this molar had done decay and would need some work, which couldn't be fine that day as we had booked an emergency appointment just to deal with the chips. Unfortunately, I'm also on chemo at the moment, so it took a few weeks to get him back to reassess the molar as I was just too sick. When we went back, the dentist advised then that it would be best to extract it, but he also suggested extracting the other three molars ad well, which aside from the enamel deficiency, are all perfectly healthy. I wasn't comfortable with that so he gave me a referral to an orthodontist for another opinion - his reason for wanting to do those extractions was to keep his bite aligned, but I just couldn't come to grips with extracting three perfectly healthy teeth all because of one decayed one. Saw the ortho yesterday and fortunately, he agreed with me. Definitely just the one to be extracted, although he could see where the dentist was coming from and was impressed that the dentist was thinking long term about alignment. The ortho also took photos of his teeth and unfortunately the molar had gotten even worse in the last few weeks to the point that there is a visible hole in the back of the tooth - probably a third of the tooth is missing. Fortunately not much pain at the moment but that's only a matter of time. Going tomorrow for the extraction. I just feel so bad for him as it's not his fault. Every other tooth is fine and both the ortho and dentist said that his oral hygiene is excellent, it's just this one tooth. Poor kid 😔

#23 daybreaker

Posted 08 August 2019 - 10:54 PM

Maybe ask for fissure sealant for the other 3 teeth to prevent decay.

I've had many teeth extracted, as a child and adult, and once the needle is done you can't feel anything. Just try not to eat on that side for a few days.

#24 CallMeFeral

Posted 08 August 2019 - 11:19 PM

View PostVeritas Vinum Arte, on 08 August 2019 - 04:06 PM, said:

I had 4 adult molars removed at 12 yrs in the chair. Was the worst experience of my life andgave me a huge phobia of dentists for the next 30 years. Even today any dental work is actually done without a needle as I hate the numb feeling and find the needles more painful than the actual dental work.

Interesting. I had my wisdom teeth out in the chair around the same age and am now the same with needles.

#25 Veritas Vinum Arte

Posted 09 August 2019 - 11:54 AM

They offered to take my wisdom teeth out last year in the chair at 44 (due to cavities- small mouth and can’t get around the back of the teeth), but I was no way in hell to the chair and LOVED the GA.




3 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 3 guests, 0 anonymous users

 

'My parenting style is Survivalist'

A helicopter or tiger mum, I am not.

8 mums reveal their favourite nappy bags

We asked a bunch of mums which nappy bags they love the most.

Why you shouldn't bother throwing a big first birthday party

If you're feeling the pressure to host an all-out, over-the-top shindig for your baby's birthday, I hereby grant you permission to throw the rules out the window.

The 24 baby names on the verge of extinction this year

If you're on the hunt for the perfect baby name and don't want a chart-topper like Oliver or Olivia, then do we have the list for you.

'My mum doesn't seem that interested in my baby'

Q: My mother and I have always been close, but now that I have a baby, she has not helped out as much as I thought she would.

New guidelines: "Bottle-feeding mums need support too"

Breast is best, but mums who can't, or choose not to breastfeed need support too.

Dads also struggle to 'have it all', study finds

Men and women both experience work-family conflict.

Language development may start in the womb

Study found babies can recognise foreign languages before birth.

Meet the baby born from an embryo frozen for 24 years

Experts say little Emma is a record breaking baby.

 
Advertisement
 
Advertisement
 
 
 

From our network

Five things you need to know about flu and pregnancy

As the 2017 flu season begins in earnest, here?s what you need to know to protect yourself and baby.

Mum tips to keep your pre-baby budget in check

Money might be funny in a rich man's world (or so ABBA told us), but for the rest of us it's a major consideration – particularly before having a baby.

5 easy ways to make your maternity leave last longer

Maternity leave is a special time for you, your partner and your new little bundle. The last thing you want is for financial worries to stand in the way of that joy.

10 ways to keep your 'buying for baby' costs down

Becoming a parent is full of surprises – not least of all finding out that, for such small beings, babies cause a lot of chaos and expense.

5 ways to prepare to go from two incomes to one

Here are some ideas for getting that budget in shape, ready for being a one income family.

 

Baby Names

Need some ideas?

See what names are trending this year.

 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.